Set the World on Fire: Black Nationalist Women and the Global Struggle for Freedom

Set the World on Fire Black Nationalist Women and the Global Struggle for Freedom In Mittie Maude Lena Gordon spoke to a crowd of black Chicagoans at the old Jack Johnson boxing ring rallying their support for emigration to West Africa In Celia Jane Allen traveled to J

  • Title: Set the World on Fire: Black Nationalist Women and the Global Struggle for Freedom
  • Author: Keisha N. Blain
  • ISBN: 0812249887
  • Page: 494
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In 1932, Mittie Maude Lena Gordon spoke to a crowd of black Chicagoans at the old Jack Johnson boxing ring, rallying their support for emigration to West Africa In 1937, Celia Jane Allen traveled to Jim Crow Mississippi to organize rural black workers around black nationalist causes In the late 1940s, from her home in Kingston, Jamaica, Amy Jacques Garvey launched an ext In 1932, Mittie Maude Lena Gordon spoke to a crowd of black Chicagoans at the old Jack Johnson boxing ring, rallying their support for emigration to West Africa In 1937, Celia Jane Allen traveled to Jim Crow Mississippi to organize rural black workers around black nationalist causes In the late 1940s, from her home in Kingston, Jamaica, Amy Jacques Garvey launched an extensive letter writing campaign to defend the Greater Liberia Bill, which would relocate 13 million black Americans to West Africa.Gordon, Allen, and Jacques Garvey as well as Maymie De Mena, Ethel Collins, Amy Ashwood, and Ethel Waddell are part of an overlooked and understudied group of black women who take center stage in Set the World on Fire, the first book to examine how black nationalist women engaged in national and global politics from the early twentieth century to the 1960s Historians of the era generally portray the period between the Garvey movement of the 1920s and the Black Power movement of the 1960s as an era of declining black nationalist activism, but Keisha N Blain reframes the Great Depression, World War II, and early Cold War as significant eras of black nationalist and particularly, black nationalist women s ferment.In Chicago, Harlem, and the Mississippi Delta, from Britain to Jamaica, these women built alliances with people of color around the globe, agitating for the rights and liberation of black people i

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      Keisha N. Blain

    About "Keisha N. Blain"

    1. Keisha N. Blain

      Keisha N Blain is a historian of the 20th century United States with broad interdisciplinary interests and specializations in African American History, the modern African Diaspora, and Women s and Gender Studies She completed a PhD in History at Princeton University Her research interests include black internationalism, radical politics, and global feminisms She is currently an Assistant Profe Keisha N Blain is a historian of the 20th century United States with broad interdisciplinary interests and specializations in African American History, the modern African Diaspora, and Women s and Gender Studies She completed a PhD in History at Princeton University Her research interests include black internationalism, radical politics, and global feminisms She is currently an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh Her new book, Set the World On Fire Black Nationalist Women and the Global Struggle for Freedom University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018 , uncovers the crucial role women played in building black nationalist and internationalist protest movements in the United States and other parts of the African Diaspora during the twentieth century She is one of the co editors of Charleston Syllabus Readings on Race, Racism and Racial Violence University of Georgia Press, 2016

    186 thoughts on “Set the World on Fire: Black Nationalist Women and the Global Struggle for Freedom”

    1. Marvelous The best kind of history in that it takes a period that past histories have confronted in a vastly different way and fundamentally reshapes how one views the period Restores the legacy of important women in the nationalism struggle most frequently associated with Garvey, Du Bois and Robeson Highly recommended.


    2. finished this and found it absolutely fascinatingi think what got me the most was the intersection of working with ethnonationalists to try to secure funding to emigrate to liberiagood overview of post garvey thought and praxis


    3. A trenchant analysis of the Black women activists who shaped twentieth century Black nationalist organizing, mobilization and politics while infusing Black feminist principles and practice in male dominated contexts One of the most intriguing examples of this dynamic was activist Laura Adorker Kofey, who was murdered in 1928 after challenging male leadership, yet inspired legions of followers to continue her religious and political work decades later in West Africa and the American South Throu A [...]


    4. Traditional narrative holds that the golden age of black nationalism ended in the 1920s after the arrest and deportation of Marcus Garvey and that the movement remained dormant until the 1960s Blaine clearly proves that black nationalism was a vibrant movement in the period between 1925 and 1965 Moreover, she demonstrates conclusively that women were leaders in this black nationalist movement There is much in this book I am sure that I am not alone in being surprised that the black nationali Tra [...]





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